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Freedom and Justice

2011 Air Force Public Affairs Agency Speech Series

Memorial Day 2011

(Note to narrator: If you have the capability to play music at your event, "Taps" is appropriate. Download the .mp3 audio file from the USAF Band Web site)

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Good (afternoon, evening) ladies and gentlemen, friends, families and veterans - and welcome.

HISTORY
Today (Memorial Day) is a bittersweet day as we pause to share our time, stories and memories of America's military heroes with each other and to recognize in perpetuity the names and faces of our Fallen - our Airmen - and those of America's Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen and all who have carried the shield in America's wars and paid the ultimate sacrifice in defense of our great Nation.

Decoration Day, as this day was first called, is a day of reverence, remembrance and celebration for all Americans who died in our Nation's wars. Decoration Day originated May 5th, 1868, three years after the Civil War ended, when Major General John Logan, the head of a veterans organization called the Grand Army of the Republic, designated May 30th as the day to cherish "the memory of our heroic dead, who made their breasts a barricade between our country and its foes."1

The first major observance of Decoration Day was held that same year at Arlington National Cemetery. After speeches from dignitaries, children from the Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphan Home and members of the Grand Army of the Republic made their way through the cemetery, laying flowers and placing American flags on the graves of the war dead.2 It wasn't until 1888 that Decoration Day was recognized as a federal holiday.3 Although the term "Memorial Day" was first used in 1882, it did not become more common until after World War II.4 Over the years, but not until after World War I, Memorial Day was expanded to honor those who died in all American wars.5 Memorial Day was declared the official name by Federal law in 1967, and in 1971 Congress declared Memorial Day will be observed on the last Monday in May.6

As a Nation, we have fought many wars before--and since the Civil War-- to include the American Revolution, World Wars I and II; Korean; Vietnam; the Persian Gulf and up to today's operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Over the years, America's military forces have built a tradition of honorable and faithful service to our Nation.

JUSTICE HAS BEEN DONE
In his introduction to the 2010 National Security Strategy, President Barack Obama wrote,
"For nearly a decade, our Nation has been at war with a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Even as we end one war in Iraq, our military has been called upon to renew our focus on Afghanistan as part of a commitment to disrupt, dismantle, and defeat al-Qa'ida and its affiliates. This is part of a broad, multinational effort that is right and just, and we will be unwavering in our commitment to the security of our people, allies, and partners. Moreover, as we face multiple threats - from nations, nonstate actors, and failed states - we will maintain the military superiority that has secured our country, and underpinned global security, for decades."7

On September 1st, 2010, the United States military marked a historic milestone as it made the transition from Operation IRAQI FREEDOM to Operation NEW DAWN. This transition signified a formal end to U.S. military combat operations in Iraq and reaffirmed the U.S. military's commitment to the Iraqi Security Forces and the government and people of Iraq.8

On the night of May 1st (2011), President Obama took to the airwaves to speak to America on a significant outcome in the war against al Qaeda. He said, "Tonight, I can report to the American people and to the world that the United States has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of al Qaeda, and a terrorist who's responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children."9

Nearly 10 years ago Osama bin Laden and his henchmen planned and executed the attacks of September 11, 2001, that killed 3,000 innocent Americans in New York, Washington DC and Pennsylvania.10

"The American people did not choose this fight," President Obama said in his speech. "It came to our shores, and started with the senseless slaughter of our citizens. After nearly 10 years of service, struggle, and sacrifice, we know well the costs of war."11

These efforts weigh on our Commander-in-Chief every time he has to sign a letter to a family that has lost a loved one, or look into the eyes of a service member who's been critically wounded.

"So Americans understand the costs of war," the President said. "Yet as a country, we will never tolerate our security being threatened, nor stand idly by when our people have been killed. We will be relentless in defense of our citizens and our friends and allies. We will be true to the values that make us who we are. And on nights like this one, we can say to those families who have lost loved ones to al Qaeda's terror: Justice has been done."12

"The cause of securing our country is not complete," the President continued. "But tonight, we are once again reminded that America can do whatever we set our mind to. That is the story of our history, whether it's the pursuit of prosperity for our people, or the struggle for equality for all our citizens; our commitment to stand up for our values abroad, and our sacrifices to make the world a safer place.

Fortunately, no American lives were lost during the operation that took down bin Laden but American lives have been lost over the past decade and beyond, that remind us as a Nation that, "Americans understand the costs of war."


MEMORIAL DAY ROLL CALL
Since last Memorial Day, and nine years previous, our Nation and the Air Force have lost many heroes in support of military operations overseas. We have also located and repatriated service members whose whereabouts were previously unknown, but through research, investigation, science, and plain American tenacity, have been found and repatriated with family and loved ones who, until recently, lived with but a memory of a lost hero.

Allow me to recognize those fallen Airmen, now:13

(NOTE to speaker: Reports of Air Force casualties published in DOD News Releases referenced here is current as of May 12, 2011. The speaker may want to check for casualty updates here, www.defense.gov/releases/, to see if there are any new Air Force casualties reported after the 4/29/2011 release (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14455) prior to the speaking engagement.

On June 9th, 2010, an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter crashed near Forward Operating Base Jackson in southeastern Afghanistan taking the lives of five Pararescuemen supporting an Operation ENDURING FREEDOM rescue mission. Killed were:
Staff Sergeant Michael Flores and Senior Airman Benjamin White, both assigned to the 48th Rescue Squadron at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona; and 1st Lieutenant Joel Gentz assigned to the 58th Rescue Squadron and Staff Sergeant David Smith, assigned to the 66th Rescue Squadron, both collocated at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.i
Capt David Wisniewski, also assigned to the 66th Rescue Squadron, survived the crash but died July 2nd (2010) of injuries sustained during the crash.ii

Senior Airman James Hansen died September 15th (2010) of wounds suffered during a controlled detonation at Joint Base Balad, Iraq, while supporting Operation NEW DAWN. He was assigned to the 46th Operations Support Squadron, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.iii

Senior Airman Daniel Sanchez died September 16th (2010) while conducting combat operations in Oruzgan province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to the 23rd Special Tactics Squadron, Hurlburt Field, Florida.iv

Senior Airman Michael Buras died September 21st (2010) of wounds suffered as the result of an improvised explosive device detonation in Kandahar, Afghanistan. He was assigned to the 99th Civil Engineer Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.v

Senior Airman Mark Forester died September 29th (2010) in Oruzgan province, Afghanistan, while conducting combat operations in the area. He was assigned to the 21st Special Tactics Squadron, Pope Air Force Base, North Carolina.vi

Senior Airman Daniel Johnson died October 5th (2010) of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device in Kandahar, Afghanistan. He was assigned to the 30th Civil Engineer Squadron, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.vii

Senior Airman Andrew Bubacz died November 12th (2010) from a fatal head injury while maintaining a communications tower in Nuristan, Afghanistan while serving with a provincial reconstruction team. He was assigned to the 97th Communications Squadron, Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma.viii

Lieutenant Colonel Gwendolyn Locht, who was supporting Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, died November 16th (2010) in Houston, Texas of a non-combat related illness after she was medically evacuated from Kandahar, Afghanistan, for treatment on May 22nd. She was assigned to the 96th Inpatient Operations Squadron, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.ix

Technical Sergeant Leslie Williams, who was deployed in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, died January 25th (2011) due to a non-combat related incident at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. He was assigned to the 4th Maintenance Group, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina.x

Airman 1st Class Christoffer Johnson, who was supporting Operation NEW DAWN, died February 17th (2011) due to a non-combat related incident in Southwest Asia. He was assigned to the 423rd Security Forces Squadron, Royal Air Force Alconbury, United Kingdom.xi

Airman 1st Class Corey Owens, who was supporting Operation NEW DAWN, died February 17th (2011) due to a non-combat related incident at Al Asad Air Base, Iraq. He was assigned to the 47th Security Forces Squadron, Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas.xii

Senior Airman Nicholas Alden, enroute to Ramstein Air Base, Germany to support overseas contingency operations, died as a result of the March 2nd (2011) shooting at Frankfurt International Airport, Germany. He was assigned to the 48th Security Forces Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, United Kingdom.xiii Also killed in the same shooting that day was Airman 1st Class Zachary Cuddeback, assigned to the 86th Vehicle Readiness Squadron at Ramstein.xiv Two other Airmen were wounded.

Senior Airman Michael Hinkle the Second, who was supporting Operation NEW DAWN, died March 16th (2011) due to a non-combat related incident in Southwest Asia. He was assigned to the 28th Communications Squadron, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota.xv

And, most recently, eight Airmen who were supporting Operation ENDURING FREEDOM died of wounds suffered from gunfire April 27th (2011), at the Kabul International Airport, Afghanistan. Although the incident is under investigation, their deaths are mournful.
Killed were:
Major Philip Ambard, who was assigned to the 460th Space Communications Squadron, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado;
Major Jeffrey Ausborn, who was assigned to the 99th Flying Training Squadron, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas;
Major David Brodeur, who was assigned to the 11th Air Force, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska;
Master Sergeant Tara Brown, who was assigned to the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility Washington, Maryland;
Lieutenant Colonel Frank Bryant Jr., who was assigned to the 56th Operations Group, Luke Air Force Base, Arizona;
Major Raymond Estelle the Second, who was assigned to Headquarters Air Combat Command, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia;
Captain Nathan Nylander, who was assigned to the 25th Operational Weather Squadron, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona;
AND
Captain Charles Ransom, who was assigned to the 83rd Network Operations Squadron, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.xvi

If I have omitted any Airmen from this Memorial Day roll call that you are personally aware of it by no means diminishes their undeniable and selfless service to our Nation. Please share their names with others in remembrance for thought and prayer.

As we remember those who most recently lost their lives while serving our country, we must also remember all the American warriors who have served before them and lost their lives in America's wars.

In General Orders Number 11 that General Logan wrote designating Decoration Day 143 years ago he said, "Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic."14

GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN
Ladies and gentlemen, as a Nation, we have not forgotten the cost of freedom and we do not forget our fallen warriors.

On September 21st, (2010), Chief Master Sergeant Richard Etchberger was posthumously bestowed the Medal of Honor 43 years after his heroic act at a covert radar installation in Laos where only seven of 19 Airmen survived an enemy attack -- three of those saved were a direct result of his actions. His name will live on in the Hall of Heroes at the Pentagon and on the Air Force Memorial in Arlington, Virginia.

"Legends like Chief Etchberger serve as role models for the latest generation of Airmen performing extraordinary deeds today far from home," Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley said. "Under [the three words on the Air Force Memorial]: valor, courage and sacrifice, Chief Etchberger's name will now endure at this memorial as a permanent record of our Nation's highest esteem."15

If you're aware of the mission of the Department of Defense Prisoner of War and Missing Personnel Office, you know they are all dedicated to the single mission of finding and bringing our missing personnel home. More than 88,000 Americans are missing from World War II, the Korean War, the Cold War, the Vietnam War and the 1991 Gulf War.16

Since last Memorial Day, 35 U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army Air Forces Airmen missing since World War II, and the Korean and Vietnam Wars, have been identified, and have been or are being repatriated with their families for burial with full military honors. Missing the longest, yet repatriated most recently, is U.S. Army Air Forces Private First Class Mervyn Sims. Pfc. Sims and four crew members aboard a C-87 Liberator Express departed from Yangkai, China, on April 24, 1943, in support of "the Hump" resupply mission between India and China when their aircraft was reported missing. Pfc Sims' remains were later identified when an American citizen in Burma found a crash site in India and attempted to leave the country with human remains and artifacts from the site. Attempts by the DPMO to excavate the site are still being negotiated with the Indian government but in the meantime, PFC Sims was buried April 22nd (2011) in his hometown.17

WITH DIGNITY
Our Nation does not forget these Airmen - and the Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen - and all who paid the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. They are all cared for throughout their final journey home. The Air Force Mortuary Affairs Operations Center at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, is responsible for the return of all Department of Defense personnel from Overseas Contingency Operations and all other overseas deaths. Remains of the fallen are escorted to Dover where a solemn, dignified transfer -- moving the transfer case from an aircraft to a waiting vehicle and then to the port mortuary -- occurs immediately upon arrival. This movement is sanctified by a carry team of military personnel from the fallen member's respective service. A dignified transfer is conducted for every U.S. military member who dies in the theater of operation while in the service of their country. The fallen member is then prepared with great care and compassion for their final journey home to their family and loved ones.18



FAMILIES OF THE FALLEN
The families of the fallen are not forgotten, either.

Last year, (In January (2010), the Air Force Chief of Staff, General Norton Schwartz, dedicated the Center for Families of the Fallen at the Air Force Mortuary Affairs Operations Center at Dover Air Force Base. The Center is one manifestation of our fidelity to properly honor our fallen and care for the families, so that when families from all over the country come to receive their loved ones for the last time, they do so in a place that befits their grief, and can begin to offer them comfort, support, and the sincere thanks of a grateful Nation.19

On November 10th (2010), a unique, new, Fisher House for Families of the Fallen and Meditation Pavilion was donated by the Fisher House Foundation and dedicated to the Air Force at Dover to provide short-term, on-base lodging to families who travel to Dover to witness the dignified transfer of their loved one.20

At the dedication, Secretary Donley said, "Together, this new Fisher House, the Center for Families of the Fallen and the new meditation pavilion, respectfully and solemnly fulfill the Nation's sacred commitment to support the families of the fallen in every aspect of their time at Dover Air Force Base. Every part of what we do to bring the fallen home, appropriately honors the sorrowful experiences these families face in their early days of grief and loss."21

WINGMAN, RESILIENCY
As far as the Air Force is concerned, even one Airman's death is too many. Under its enduring goal and key priority to develop and care for Airmen and their families, the Air Force has embraced a continued approach that empowers Airmen to create balance and allow them to thrive in their professional and personal lives. One approach is the wingman concept established to encourage Airmen and their families to look out for each other. The term wingman stems from a time-honored tradition within our Air Force flying community that essentially says a lead pilot will never lose his or her wingman. It's a promise, a pledge, a commitment between Airmen who fly. All Airmen are encouraged to lead by example -- to be good wingmen, by taking care of themselves and those around them -- and taking action when signs of stress are observed.22

Today's missions challenge our Airmen not just in a physical sense, but mentally and emotionally as well. The Air Force's renewed focus on all of these issues through Comprehensive Airman Fitness ensures our Airmen have the tools to be successful in the battlespace and on the homefront by helping them to strike a balance across the four pillars of fitness -- physical, social, mental and spiritual. This holistic approach focuses on developing positive behaviors that equip and enable Airmen to make smarter, safer choices -- to enhance resiliency, develop critical personal life-skills, reduce self-defeating behaviors and improve individual resiliency skills.23

Taking care of oneself, being a good wingman and developing and practicing good resiliency skills go a long way toward reducing the numbers of deaths in the Air Force whether in combat or in garrison.

NATIONAL MOMENT OF REMEMBRANCE
In closing, today (On Memorial Day), and by Order of Congress, we also acknowledge a National Moment of Remembrance. On this day, Americans everywhere are asked to pause for one minute, at 3:00 p.m., local time, wherever they are, in an act of national unity to honor those who died for our freedom. 3:00 p.m. was chosen because it is the time when most Americans are enjoying their freedoms on this national holiday. The Moment does not replace our traditional Memorial Day events, rather it is a time of remembrance when we connect in solidarity as Americans.24

(Though it's not 3:00 p.m.,) At this time I'd like to pause for a moment of silence to honor our fallen.

(PAUSE FOR a moment of silence)


CONCLUSION
Today, we should actively remember our Nation's heritage and the heroes whose lives were traded for our continued freedom; remember, also, our family members, our loved ones, our neighbors, and our friends who share in their sacrifice or have lost a loved one.

So, on this, and every Memorial Day, we must never forget the meaning of Memorial Day and remember those proud patriots who made the ultimate sacrifice in the name of freedom and justice.

Thank you.


Endnotes
1General Orders No. 11, WASHINGTON, D.C., May 5, 1868, issued by Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, designating May 30, 1868 a day to decorate graves of the war dead (http://www.usmemorialday.org/order11.html)
2Memorial Day History, United States Department of Veterans Affairs (www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday/history.asp)
3CRS Report for Congress, Federal Holidays: Evolution and Application,
Congressional Research Service, The Library of Congress, updated February 8, 1999 (www.senate.gov/reference/resources/pdf/Federal_Holidays.pdf)
4Memorial Day name and date, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memorial_Day
5Celebrating America's Freedoms, The Origins of Memorial Day, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, pg. 11 (www.va.gov/opa/publications/celebrate/celebrate-america.pdf)
65 USC Sec. 6103, Office of the Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives (http://uscode.house.gov/download/pls/05C61.txt)
7President Barack Obama, 2010 National Security Strategy, The White House, May 27, 2010, pg. i (www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/rss_viewer/national_security_strategy.pdf)
8USF-Iraq, U.S. forces transition to Operation New Dawn, posted 9/1/2010 (www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123220049)
9The White House, Office of the Press Secretary, Remarks by the President on Osama Bin Laden, May 02, 2011, 11:35 P.M. EDT (www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/05/02/remarks-president-osama-bin-laden)
10AFPS News Release, Obama declares 'Justice has been done', posted 5/2/2011 (www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123254097)
11The White House, Office of the Press Secretary, Remarks by the President on Osama Bin Laden, May 02, 2011, 11:35 P.M. EDT (www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/05/02/remarks-president-osama-bin-laden)
12The White House, Office of the Press Secretary, Remarks by the President on Osama Bin Laden, May 02, 2011, 11:35 P.M. EDT (www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/05/02/remarks-president-osama-bin-laden)
13See Endnotes for Air Force Casualty and DPMO Report source references
14General Orders No. 11, WASHINGTON, D.C., May 5, 1868 (http://www.usmemorialday.org/order11.html)
15AFNS News Release, Chief Etchberger honored at Air Force Memorial, posted 3/11/2011 (www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123246457)
16Defense Prisoner of War and Missing Personnel Office home page (www.dtic.mil/dpmo/)
17DOD News Release, Missing WWII Airman Identified, No. 334-11, April 22, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14433)
18Air Force Mortuary Affairs Operations home page (www.mortuary.af.mil/)
19AFNS News Release, Chief of staff dedicates Center for Families of the Fallen, posted 1/8/2010 (www.af.mil/news/story_print.asp?id=123184477)
20AFNS News Release, Fisher House, Meditation Pavilion for families of fallen dedicated, posted 11/11/2010 (www.af.mil/news/story.aspid=123230488)
21A Nation's Commitment, Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley, Remarks at the dedication ceremony for the Fisher House for the Families of the Fallen, Dover Air Force Base, Del., Nov. 10, 2010 (www.af.mil/information/speeches/speech.asp?id=625)
22Air Force Wingman Program Fact Sheet, (www.wpafb.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=9135)
23ACCNS Feature, Comprehensive Airman Fitness aims to build resilient warriors, posted 7/26/2010 (www.acc.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123214945)
2436 USC Sec. 116, Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance Act (http://uscode.house.gov/download/pls/36C1.txt)


Notes regarding Defense Prisoner of War and Missing Personnel Office reports:
The remains of Colonel Elton Perrine were buried in Arlington National Cemetery May 24, 2010 after being missing in action since May 22, 1967, when the F-4C Phantom he was flying exploded following a nighttime strike over North Vietnam.xvii

Four of six Airmen on a combat search and rescue mission over South Vietnam had been missing in action since April 6, 1972, when the HH-53C Super Jolly Green Giant helicopter they were flying was hit by enemy ground fire and crashed. Captain Peter Chapman, the Second; Technical Sergeant Allen Avery; Technical Sergeant Roy Prater; and Sergeant James Alley, were announced found and repatriated June 14, 2010. The other two Airmen on the mission have not yet been identified.xviii

U.S. Army Air Forces Sergeant John Bonnassiolle was a crewmember aboard a B-24J Liberator when, on April 29, 1944, the plane failed to return following a bombing mission over Berlin. His remains were located near East Meitze, Germany and later returned to his family August 6, 2010.xix

Maj. Woodrow Vaden, assigned to the 1131st Special Activities Squadron, was lost on Dec. 10, 1964, aboard a C-123 Provider aircraft that crashed into a mountain near Da Nang Air Base, South Vietnam. His remains were identified on Aug. 11, 2010.xx

U.S. Army Air Forces 1st Lieutenant Ray Fletcher was reported missing on May 13, 1944, when he and four others aboard a B-25C Mitchell bomber took off from an airfield in Corsica, and failed to reach their destination. His remains were identified and returned to his family for burial August 17, 2010.xxi

U.S. Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Joe Sanchez was lost on December 23, 1944, when his B-26 Marauder aircraft crashed in western Germany. His remains were identified on Sept. 2, 2010.xxii

Colonel James Dennany and Major Robert Tucci, assigned to the 13th Tactical Fighter Squadron, were lost on November 12, 1969, aboard an F-4D Phantom II, while on an escort mission over Khammouan Province, Laos. Their remains were identified on Sept. 8, 2010.xxiii

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lieutenant Richard Ryrholm, Jr., assigned to the 432nd Fighter Squadron, was lost on September 4, 1943, near Lae, Papua New Guinea, after engaging enemy aircraft in his P-38H-5 Lightning aircraft. His remains were identified on Sept. 20, 2010.xxiv

Major Thomas Beyer, assigned to the 20th Tactical Air Support Squadron, was lost on July 30, 1968, when his O-2A Skymaster aircraft failed to return from a reconnaissance mission over South Vietnam. His remains were identified on Oct. 12, 2010.xxv

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lieutenant Arthur Parkhurst, Captain George Grismore, Technical Sergeant James Maynard, and three other crew members aboard a C-47A Skytrain were lost on March 12, 1945 after departing Tanauan Airfield on Leyte, Philippines. Their aircraft failed to reach its destination and could not be located.
Lieutenant Parkhurst was identified October 14, 2010,xxvii Captain Grismore was identified November 12, 2010 and Technical Sergeant Maynard was identified April 20, 2011,xxviii and their remains returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

U.S. Army Air Forces Staff Sergeants Claude Ray and Claude Tyler, and 2nd Lieutenant Martin Murray were recovered after the B-24D Liberator they and 9 other souls on board disappeared October 27, 1943 during a reconnaissance mission over the Bismarck Sea north of Papua New Guinea. Sergeants Ray and Tyler were later buried on October 27, 2010,xxix and Lieutenant Murray was returned to his family April 13, 2011.xxx

Major Richard Elzinga, assigned to Detachment 1, 56th Special Operations Wing, was lost on March 26, 1970, when his O-1G Birddog reconnaissance aircraft crashed in Laos. His remains were identified on Oct. 28, 2010.xxxi

U.S. Army Air Forces 2nd Lieutenant Dewey Foster, assigned to the 39th Fighter Squadron, 35th Fighter Group, was lost on April 11, 1944, northwest of Dumpu, Papua New Guinea, while on an escort mission in his P-47D Thunderbolt. His remains were identified on Nov. 2, 2010.xxxii

Captain Darrell Spinler, assigned to the 1st Air Commando Squadron, was lost on June 21, 1967, after conducting an air strike mission in Laos. His remains were identified on Jan. 5, 2011.xxxiii

1st Lieutenant Robert Dees was lost on Oct. 9, 1952, after attacking several targets in North Korea in his F-84 Thunderjet. His remains were identified and he later buried January 22, 2011.xxxiv

U.S. Army Air Forces Technical Sergeant Charles Bode, along with 10 other B-24D Liberator crew members were lost during an overwater mission near the northern coast of New Guinea on Nov. 20, 1943. The crash site with Sergeant Bode's remains and other human remains was later discovered. Sergeant Bode was buried on Feb. 11 in Arlington National Cemetery. In addition to Bode's individual burial, the crew of 11 men, 1st Lieutenant Richard Heuss; 2nd Lieutenant Robert Miller; 2nd Lieutenant Edward French; 2nd Lieutenant Robert Streckenbach; Technical Sergeant Charles Bode; Technical Sergeant Lucian Oliver, Jr.; Staff Sergeant Ivan Kirkpatrick; Staff Sergeant William Musgrave; Staff Sergeant James Moran; Staff Sergeant James Moore; and Staff Sergeant Roy Surabian, were buried as a group on March 24 at Arlington National Cemetery.xxxv

On April 24, 1943, U.S. Army Air Forces Private First Class Mervyn Sims and four crew members aboard a C-87 Liberator Express departed from Yangkai, China, in support of "the Hump" resupply mission between India and China. The Liberator never reached its destination in India. Pfc Sims' remains were later identified when an American citizen in Burma found a crash site in India and attempted to leave the country with human remains and artifacts from the site. Attempts to excavate the site are still being negotiated with the Indian government. Pfc Sims was buried April 22nd (2011) in his hometown.xxxvi

Endnotes for Air Force Casualty and DPMO Reports
iFlores/White/Gentz/Smith - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualties, No. 480-10, June 10, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13598)  
iiWisniewski - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 576-10, July 03, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13679)  
iiiHansen - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 839-10, September 16, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13889)  
ivSanchez - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 846-10, September 17, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13896)  
vBuras - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 864-10, September 22, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13910) 
viForester - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 894-10, September 30, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13934)  
viiJohnson - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 913-10, October 06, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13950)  
viiiBubacz - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 1046-10, November 13, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14059)
ixLocht - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 1103-10, December 01, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14104)  
xWilliams DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 074-11, January 27, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14232)  
xiJohnson - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 140-11, February 18, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14280)  
xiiOwens - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 136-11, February 18, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14277)  
xiiiAlden - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 173-11, March 03, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14307)  
xivCuddeback - AFNS News Release, Commander addresses Lakenheath Airmen about Frankfurt shooting, posted 3/8/2011 (www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123245698)  
xvHinkle II - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty, No. 217-11, March 17, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14343)  
xviAmbard/Ausborn/Brodeur/Brown/Bryant, Jr./Estelle II/Nylander/Ransom - DOD News Release, DOD Identifies Air Force Casualties, No. 360-11, April 29, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14455)  xviiPerrine - DOD News Release, Air Force Pilot Missing From Vietnam War Identified, No. 453-10, June 02, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13576)  
xviiiHH-53C - DOD News Release, Air Force MIAS from Vietnam War are Identified, No. 490-10, June 14, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13605)  xixBonnassiolle - DOD News Release, Airman Missing in Action from WWII Identified, No. 700-10, August 06, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=63001)  
xxVaden - DPMO Recently Accounted-For, Aug. 11, 2010 (www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/)  
xxiFletcher - DOD News Release, Airman Missing In Action From WWII Identified, No. 733-10, August 17, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13803)  
xxiiSanchez - DPMO Recently Accounted-For, Sept. 2, 2010 (www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/)  
xxiiiDennany - DPMO Recently Accounted-For, Sept. 8, 2010 (www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/)  
xxivRyrholm - DPMO Recently Accounted-For, Sept. 20, 2010 (www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/)  
xxvBeyer - DPMO Recently Accounted-For, Oct. 12, 2010 (www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/) 
xxviParkhurst - DOD News Release, Missing WWII Airman Identified, No. 937-10, October 14, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13969)  
xxviiGrismore - DOD News Release, Missing WWII Airman Identified, No. 1044-10, November 12, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14057)  
xxviiiMaynard - DOD News Release, Missing WWII Airman Identified, No. 316-11, April 20, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14419)  
xxixRay/Tyler - DOD News Release, Airmen Missing in Action from WWII Identified, No. 987-10, October 27, 2010 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14011)  
xxxMurray - DOD News Release, Airman Missing in Action from WWII Identified, No. 300-11, April 13, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14407)  
xxxiElzinga - DPMO Recently Accounted-For, Oct. 28, 2010 (http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/)  
xxxiiFoster - DPMO Recently Accounted-For, Nov. 2, 2010 (http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/)
xxxiiiSpinler - DPMO Recently Accounted-For, (http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/accounted_for/)  
xxxivDees - DPMO News Release, Airman Missing In Action From Korean War Is Identified, Jan. 21, 2011 (http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/news/news_releases/2011/release_dees.pdf)  xxxvBode - DOD News Release, Airmen Missing in Action From WWII Identified, No. 112-11, February 10, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14260)  
xxxviSims - DOD News Release, Missing WWII Airman Identified, No. 334-11, April 22, 2011 (www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14433)



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